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Webinar: A Qualitative Study of Social, Cultural, and Historical Influences on some African American Women’s Infant-Feeding Practices

Webinar: A Qualitative Study of Social, Cultural, and Historical Influences on some African American Women’s Infant-Feeding Practices

Webinar: A Qualitative Study of Social, Cultural, and Historical Influences on some African American Women’s Infant-Feeding Practices

Stephanie DeVane-Johnson, PhD, CNM
Stephanie DeVane-Johnson, PhD, CNM
on behalf of Lamaze International

$20.00 $ 20.00 $ 20.00

$20.00 $ 20.00 $ 20.00

$ 20.00 $ 20.00 $ 20.00
$ 20.00 $ 20.00 $ 20.00
Normal Price: $20.00 $20.00

Review:

Launch date: 24 Sep 2018
Expiry Date: 01 Oct 2020

Last updated: 01 Sep 2019

Reference: 192656

This course is no longer available

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Latest User Comments

Doris Gayles (6 Dec 2018)
It was great to have this research from focus groups, including different ages of African American women and not just anecdotal info. Also, I appreciated the statistics on the number of deaths that could be prevented by BF.
(31 Dec 2018)
She was a great speaker and answered questions well.
Ms Amy Comport BSN, LCCE, CLC (30 Sep 2018)
I can implement your suggestions at work. Very helpful.

I would like to...

Description

African Americans have the lowest breastfeeding rate of any race. Despite widespread agreement that breastfeeding is optimal nutrition and essential for long-term health benefits there is a breastfeeding disparity along racial/ ethnic lines. Evidence suggests that women do not decide on an infant feeding methods alone. There are social barriers, family traditions/cultural and socio-historical influences that affect infant feeding decisions for some African American mothers. The purpose of this presentation is to identify and describe cultural/socio-historical factors influencing breastfeeding beliefs and behaviors among contemporary African American women. Socio-historical factors include events, experiences and other phenomena that have been socially, generationally, and culturally passed down and integrated into families and communities that influence health beliefs and health behaviors.

Participants may earn 1 Lamaze Contact Hour and 1.25 contact hours for CABRN. 1.0 L-CERPs recognized by IBLCE.

Objectives

Describe cultural factors influencing some African American mothers’ perceptions about infant feeding.
I. Family Traditions
A. Bottle feeding was normal
Describe historical events that potentially have influenced breastfeeding outcomes in the African American community.
II. Slavery
A. Mammy caricature
List social barriers that impact breastfeeding success.
III. Work issues
A. No breastfeeding support
IV. Questions and discussion
Stephanie DeVane-Johnson, PhD, CNM

Author Information Play Video Bio

Stephanie DeVane-Johnson, PhD, CNM
on behalf of Lamaze International

Stephanie DeVane-Johnson, PhD, CNM is an Assistant Professor at Duke University in the School of Nursing. She received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, a Master of Science Degree in Nursing and Certification in Nurse-Midwifery from Vanderbilt University and a PhD in Nursing from UNC-Chapel Hill. She has been a Certified Nurse-Midwife for 20 years and has extensive experience in maternal /child health.
Dr. DeVane-Johnson has worked in private practice settings as well as academic institutions, providing care for women from all ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. Her passion and program of research is breastfeeding and health disparities in African Americans. She has written and published on the impact that cultural and socio-historical influences have on African American infant feeding decisions. Dr. DeVane-Johnson is also on the Board of Directors for a “Pathway 2 Breastfeeding” program. A community initiative that aims to combat health disparities in the African-American community by increasing the number of Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLC) of color who can provide breastfeeding education and support.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • California Board of Registered Nursing (CBRN)
  • 1.25 Hours

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Nurse Planner: Susan Givens, BSN, RNC-OB, MPH, LCCE

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

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User Reviews (5)

Go Back
Doris Gayles (6 Dec 2018)
It was great to have this research from focus groups, including different ages of African American women and not just anecdotal info. Also, I appreciated the statistics on the number of deaths that could be prevented by BF.
(31 Dec 2018)
She was a great speaker and answered questions well.
Ms Amy Comport BSN, LCCE, CLC (30 Sep 2018)
I can implement your suggestions at work. Very helpful.
Ariana Medina (29 Dec 2018)
loved the information!
Mrs Monica Venable MPH, ICCE, CLE (27 Dec 2018)
Very cutting-edge information that displays struggles and barriers some African-American mothers face.

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