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Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

Dinah Gould
Dinah Gould
on behalf of Royal College of Nursing

$30.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00

$30.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00

$ 30.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00
$ 30.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00
Normal Price: $30.00 $30.00

Review:

Launch date: 29 Jan 2018
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 25 Oct 2019

Reference: 186370

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Latest User Comments

Holroyd, Sharon (9 Oct 2019)
a nice refresher for non specialist staff
irawati, Irawati (30 May 2019)
this course as a whole good for increase knowledge
Kleinman, Gretha (29 May 2019)
In the course you mention the NICE guideline.
I've learned from it (and from several other guidelines, including the Dutch Verenso guideline for vulnerable elderly) what influence the Bioflim has in developing a CAUTI. The information about it is very poor in this course.
Also these guidelines recommend in case of a suspected CAUTI (with symptoms) to remove the catheter, to take a culture of fresh, spontaneously voided urine or (in case of continuing the use of an indwelling catheter) to take a culture from the new inserted catheter.
Al of this because of the influence of the Biofilm on the results of the culture and the resistance of the bacteria for antibiotic treatment.
In this course I only read about taking cultures from a sampling point. In my opinion you than take a culture of the Biofilm, instead of the free floading bacteria in the bladder.
Also mentioned, drainage bags for home-use often do not have a sampling point.

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Description

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in hospital and community settings. The major risk factor for developing a UTI is having a urethral catheter. The longer the catheter remains in place, the higher the risk of infection. The consensus in guidelines is that indwelling urethral catheters should not be used unless necessary and should be removed within 24 hours if possible. The care of patients and nursing home residents who are catheterised for long periods could be improved if guidelines were implemented fully.

Objectives

The care of patients with indwelling urethral catheters is an important nursing responsibility. A urethral catheter is the major risk factor for developing a urinary tract infection (UTI) and the longer the catheter remains in place, the higher the risk of infection (Lo et al 2014). Catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI) is one of the most common types of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) and has implications for patient safety and the costs of healthcare delivery (Oman et al 2012).

On completion of this course you will gain an understanding of:
Identify the risk factors for CAUTI and other potential complications of urethral catheterisation.
Dinah Gould

Author Information Play Video Bio

Dinah Gould
on behalf of Royal College of Nursing

Professor of nursing, school of healthcare sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Royal College of Nursing (RCN)
  • 1.00 Hours

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

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User Reviews (4)

Go Back
Holroyd, Sharon (9 Oct 2019)
a nice refresher for non specialist staff
irawati, Irawati (30 May 2019)
this course as a whole good for increase knowledge
Kleinman, Gretha (29 May 2019)
In the course you mention the NICE guideline. I've learned from it (and from several other guidelines, including the Dutch Verenso guideline for vulnerable elderly) what influence the Bioflim has in developing a CAUTI. The information about it is very poor in this course. Also these guidelines recommend in case of a suspected CAUTI (with symptoms) to remove the catheter, to take a culture of fresh, spontaneously voided urine or (in case of continuing the use of an indwelling catheter) to take a culture from the new inserted catheter. Al of this because of the influence of the Biofilm on the results of the culture and the resistance of the bacteria for antibiotic treatment. In this course I only read about taking cultures from a sampling point. In my opinion you than take a culture of the Biofilm, instead of the free floading bacteria in the bladder. Also mentioned, drainage bags for home-use often do not have a sampling point.
Bassas Parga, Anaïs (12 Apr 2019)
Perfect. Very interessant and complete. With a lot of usefull information.

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