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Suicide in Teenagers

Suicide in Teenagers

Suicide in Teenagers

Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist
Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

$10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00

$10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00

$ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00
$ 10.00 $ 10.00 $ 10.00
Normal Price: $10.00 $10.00

Review:

Launch date: 25 Sep 2017
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 28 Aug 2018

Reference: 184838

This course is no longer available

Exam is embedded in the course
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Latest User Comments

Susan Keohane (17 Apr 2018)
Please let me restart course I just paid for it
Mrs CATHERINE CLAPP (14 Jun 2018)
I appreciated being able to read all the statistics and more readily identify risk factors

I would like to...

Description

Suicide and youth hardly seem like they should have anything in common. Unfortunately, the statistics tell us that they have too much in common. Suicide is the third leading cause of death for youth between 10 and 24 years of age. In 1981, suicide amongst 10 to 14 year olds was the fourth leading cause of death, but it has moved up to third place today. In no other age group does suicide rank this high; however, bear in mind that suicide is a major public health problem regardless of age. It is one of the top ten leading causes of death in the United States, ranking 8th or 9th for the last few decades. The collected data basically involve suicide (meaning successful). There is no national database of attempted suicide. However, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, conducted by the CDC biennially, provides information on young people and reports that a large number of youth in grades 9 through 12 consider or attempt suicide. This article will look at current studies, the risk factors, the pathology, and interventions of youth and suicide.

In one recent survey of high school students, 60% said they had thought about killing themselves. About 9% said they had tried at least once. Why has the youth suicide rate become so high in recent years?

It's easier to get the tools for suicide (Boys often use firearms to kill themselves; girls usually use pills); the pressures of modern life are greater; competition for good grades and college admission is stiff; and there is more violence in the newspapers and on television.

Lack of parental interest may be another problem. Many children grow up in divorced households, whereas for others, both parents work and their families spend limited time together. According to one study 90% of suicidal teen-agers believed their families did not understand them. However, this is such a common teenage complaint that other factors are playing a role, as well. Young people also reported that when they tried to tell their parents about their feelings of unhappiness or failure, their mother and father ignored or rejected their point of view.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
1. Define the significant statistical issues that surround teen suicide.

2. Discuss the traditional and non-traditional risk factors that are associated with teen suicide.

3. Describe the potential intervention strategies for preventing teen suicide and the National Objectives for Gate Keepers.
Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist

Author Information Play Video Bio

Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist
on behalf of e-Ed Credits

Colleen Symanski-Sanders, RN, Forensic Nurse Specialist, has been a Registered Nurse for over 18 years. She has extended her education into forensic nursing, criminal profiling, and psychopathy receiving a Certificate as a Forensic Nurse Specialist. She has over 16 years experience in public health and home care nursing.

Colleen has been an author of educational material for St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, Florida. She has also lectured on a variety of topics at numerous nursing symposiums and conferences across the country. She is on the Editorial Board for "Home Health Aide Digest" and "Private Duty Homecare" publications.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
  • 1.00 Hours

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

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User Reviews (2)

Go Back
Susan Keohane (17 Apr 2018)
Please let me restart course I just paid for it
Mrs CATHERINE CLAPP (14 Jun 2018)
I appreciated being able to read all the statistics and more readily identify risk factors

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