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Use of Anthrax Vaccine in the USA

Use of Anthrax Vaccine in the USA

Use of Anthrax Vaccine in the USA

Medical Education Systems, Inc.
Medical Education Systems, Inc.
on behalf of Medical Education Systems Inc

$40.00 $ 40.00 $ 40.00

$40.00 $ 40.00 $ 40.00

$ 40.00 $ 40.00 $ 40.00
$ 40.00 $ 40.00 $ 40.00
Normal Price: $40.00 $40.00

Review:

Launch date: 09 Jul 2016
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 11 Jan 2018

Reference: 163640

This course is no longer available

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Description

Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis (1,2 ). The disease most commonly occurs in wild and domestic mammals (e.g., cattle, sheep, goats, camels, antelope, and other herbivores) ( 3). Anthrax occurs in humans when they are exposed to infected animals or tissue from infected animals or when they are directly exposed to B. anthracis spores ( 4--6). Depending on the route of exposure, anthrax can occur in three forms: cutaneous, gastrointestinal, or inhalation.
Today, B. anthracis is considered one of the most serious biowarfare or bioterrorism agents because of the ability of the spores to persist in the environment, the ability of the aerosolized spores to readily cause infection via respiratory (inhalation) exposure, and the high mortality of resulting inhalation anthrax ( 7--9). CDC has classified anthrax as a category A biological warfare agent ( 10 ), meaning it has great potential to adversely affect public health. The lethality of aerosolized B. anthracis spores was demonstrated in 1979 when an unintentional release of B. anthracis spores from a military microbiology facility in the former Soviet Union resulted in 64 deaths ( 11 ). The cases of anthrax that occurred after B. anthracis spores were distributed through the U.S. mail in 2001 further underscored the potential dangers of this organism as a bioterrorism threat ( 12--15 ).
Vaccines against anthrax were first developed as early as 1880 and used in livestock ( 16 ). An acellular product for human use was developed in 1954 and used in the first U.S. efficacy study of human anthrax vaccine ( 17 ). This product was later modified, resulting in anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) ( 18 ), the vaccine currently approved for use in the United States. AVA prepared using B. anthracis V770-NP1-R was first licensed in the United States in 1972 as a 6-dose, subcutaneously (SC) administered priming series with annual boosters for persons in occupations placing them at risk for exposure. AVA also is available as a component of a postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) regimen under an Investigational New Drug (IND) protocol ( 19 ) and may be made available under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) ( 20--22 ).

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:
● Identify the five main changes in the 2000 recommendations regarding anthrax vaccine
● Identify which animals are most commonly infected with anthrax
● Identify the pathogenesis of anthrax
● Identify the primary steps to the control and prevention of anthrax
Medical Education Systems, Inc.

Author Information Play Video Bio

Medical Education Systems, Inc.
on behalf of Medical Education Systems Inc

Medical Systems, Inc. provides home study courses and contact hours ('s) for EMTs, Nurses, Respiratory Therapists, Sleep Therapists, and other healthcare professionals. We understand that every profession has different requirements for contact hours as set forth by your professional society and your state board requirements.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • California Board of Registered Nursing (CBRN)
  • 7.00 Hours
  • Florida Board of Nursing
  • 7.00 Hours -
    Exam Pass Rate: 70
  • District of Columbia Board of Nursing (DCBON)
  • 7.00 Hours

Faculty and Disclosures

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Conflicts Declared

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